Dr Bill Rogers' Conference Presentation Anti-Bullying Network
Back
 
  Tactically ignoring    

It is also unnecessary when he says, ‘I’ll be alright now’, to say, ‘Sure you’ll be alright, you promise’. For example, this boy here, this is an infant classroom, it’s fairly old example, it’s back to 2001 again. This boy emm, Matthew is pushing Michael really hard in the back while I’m working with Linda at the front here, reading a story. I’d already reminded him about safe, ah, safe hands, safe hand, eh, hands on your lap, eh, hands on your lap, hee-hee-hee. And he went into low-grade non-elective nuisance, which at that point you tactically ignore. Now the third time he did it, right cool off time over here, which is in-class time, cool off time over here. And he said ‘I’ll be alright now, I’ll BE ALRIGHT NOW!’ You don’t plea bargain with kids. If you need, believe you need to be that intrusive in the sense of directing him to sit away from others, in a cool off time place, not a naughty corner, not a sin-bin, but a respectful clear communication to Matthew and to the class that that level of pushing, and he really did push him, or high-level poking or pulling hair, not just mini-touching hair, I’m not talking about that, then you carry it through with certainty. As I, and I said to the group I was working with, ok I want you to quietly talk amongst yourselves, whisper voices, whisper voices, while I just take MATTHEW, over, to the cool off time corner. No, don’t do that. As I’m walking him away and the kids are whispering, with Linda just, he said ‘Oh, I HATE this, I HATE THIS CLASS!’. That’s the bit you tactically ignore, isn’t it? You don’t say, ‘and I hate you too! I hate you with a temporary vehemence.’ Leave all that rubbish out, it’s tempting, I’m not saying it’s not tempting. But sometimes your gut overtakes your brain and I understand that. Ohh, dear. It’s an interesting profession.

Tactically ignoring