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What are the different types of bullying?

In a 1997 study in England, 2,308 children were asked about bullying in school. When those who had been bullied were asked what form it had taken, almost 75% said they had been called nasty names, making it by far the most common type of bullying. The second most common type (38%) was spreading rumours or lies. A lot of children (31%) felt that they had been kept out of things or ignored. Almost a quarter (21%) said they had been kicked, pushed around or physically bullied in some other way. 14% had suffered racial name calling, while 8% answered that their money or belongings had been taken or damaged. When bullies were asked about the different types, by far the most common was nasty name calling (71%). The second most common type was keeping someone out of things, with 29% admitting to doing this. 17% had spread lies or rumours about someone, while 16% had hit, pushed around or in some other way, physically bullied another pupil. 13% admitted to racial name calling and 3% to taking or damaging someone's money or possessions.
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Article details

P K Smith and Shu Shu (2000), 'What Good Schools Can Do About Bullying: findings from a survey in English schools after a decade of research and action', in 'Childhood' Volume 7 Number 2.
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Graph details

'Types of bullying, as reported by those bullied and those taking part in bullying' from Smith and Shu article above, table 3, page 200.

Victims Bullies
Boys Girls Boys Girls
Called mean and hurtful names, made fun of in other ways 75.1 74.5 74.7 65.0
Others told lies, spread rumours, made others dislike me 35.4 40.5 16.2 18.3
Others kept me out of things, excluded or ignored me 27.4 35.5 21.2 41.7
Hit, kicked, pushed, shoved around, threatened 27.4 14.0 20.2 8.3
Money or other things taken away from me or damaged 8.0 7.9 5.1 0.0
Called mean or hurtful names about my colour or race 16.1 11.5 17.2 6.7

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Author details

Peter SmithProfessor Peter K Smith is Head of the Unit for School and Family Studies, Department of Psychology, Goldsmiths College, London. He has been involved in bullying research for a number of years and has published widely on this topic.

Peter Smith may be contacted by email, and the website of the Unit for School and Family Studies at Goldsmiths College may be found here.
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