ABN Homepage.

 

Click to visit the University of Edinburgh website

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click to go back!

Are there differences between types of school?

A large study of bullying in schools across Ireland (O'Moore and others, 1997) found that at primary level, the size of school a pupil attended did not make it more or less likely that he/she would be bullied. However, the picture was different when it came to bullying others. It was found that reports of bullying others were highest in medium sized primary schools and lowest in large primary schools. Did size of school make a difference at secondary level? Yes, it was found that being bullied and bullying others occurred most often in small schools. Schools serving 'disadvantaged' areas (for example areas with high unemployment levels) had more pupils who reported bullying others, while no link was found between pupils being bullied and the type of area the school served. The study also found that a pupil was more likely to be bullied or to bully others in city primary schools rather than rural primary schools, however at secondary level the opposite was true.
.........................................

Article details

A M O'Moore and S J Minton 'Tackling Violence in Schools: a report from Ireland'. This report can be viewed online here.
.........................................

Professor Astrid O'MooreAuthor details

Professor Astrid Mona O'Moore has been involved in extensive research into bullying in Ireland. In 1993-94, she led the first nationwide survey of bullying behaviour in Irish schools, which looked at violence between pupils and also violence between pupils and school staff. In a more recent survey, she examined workplace bullying in schools. She is Co-ordinator of The Anti-Bullying Centre, at the Department of Education, Trinity College, The University of Dublin, Dublin, The Republic of Ireland. Professor O'Moore may be contacted by email.

In a large study which looked at bullying in English and German schools (Wolke and others, 2001) it was found that in England more bullying occurred in small rather than large schools. No such link with school size was found in Germany. It also found that in England there was slightly more bullying in rural schools rather than city schools.
.........................................

Article details

D Wolke, S Woods, K Stanford, H Schulz (2001) 'Bullying and Victimization of Primary School Children in England and Germany: prevalence and school factors' in 'British Journal of Psychology', Volume 92, Issue 4, pages 673-696.

In the early 1990s, over 6,000 primary and secondary school children in Sheffield were asked about bullying (Whitney and Smith, 1993). According to this study, the size of school did not make it more or less likely that a pupil would be bullied. Neither was the ethnic mix of the school found to affect bullying levels. However, the study did find some connection between 'social disadvantage' (looking for example at the social class of pupils and the quality of housing) and levels of bullying.
.........................................

Article details

I Whitney and P Smith (1993) 'A Survey of the Nature and Extent of Bullying in Junior/Middle and Secondary Schools' in 'Educational Research', Volume 35, Number 1, Spring.
.........................................

Peter SmithAuthor details

Professor Peter K Smith is Head of the Unit for School and Family Studies, Department of Psychology, Goldsmiths College, London. He has been involved in bullying research for a number of years and has published widely on this topic.

Peter Smith may be contacted by email, and the website of the Unit for School and Family Studies at Goldsmiths College may be found here.

A 1989 Scottish study found that there was little difference between bullying levels in city and country schools. However, it was found that bullying was more likely to occur in schools in small industrial towns, where pupils lived near the school.
.........................................

Article details

A Mellor (1989) 'Bullying. Not Worth Bothering About? A Study of Bullying in Scottish Secondary Schools', unpublished. A reference copy of this report is held by the Anti-Bullying Network.
.........................................

Andrew MellorAuthor details

At the time of the study, Andrew Mellor was a practising teacher who had received funding from the Scottish Education Department to carry out this project. He has been actively involved in anti-bullying work in Scotland for almost 15 years, speaking at conferences, writing for academic and non-academic audiences and running in-service courses for teachers. He is now manager of the Anti-Bullying Network, which is funded by the Scottish Executive and based at The University of Edinburgh.
.........................................

Back to Top