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Who could help prevent bullying?

A major programme to reduce bullying in schools has been developed in Norway. Adult involvement in this programme is seen as vital. It is claimed that if the programme is to succeed, adults in the school (and to some extent the home) must be aware of the bullying situation in the school and the majority must be committed to the anti-bullying work. The behaviour of all involved adults is also very important. They are called on to set clear and firm limits, in a positive, supportive environment (school or home).
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Article details

D Olweus, S Limber and S F Mihalic 'History and Description of the Bullying Prevention Program' in 'Blueprints for Violence Prevention', The Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence at the University of Colorado at Boulder, USA. This paper can be downloaded from here. Click on 'video segment' for an interesting video clip about the project.

The information in this paper was taken from D Olweus, S Limber and S F Mihalic (1999) 'Blueprints for Violence Prevention. Book Nine: Bullying Prevention Program', Boulder, CO: Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence.
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Author details

Professor Dan Olweus was the first person to carry out a thorough research project on Professor Dan Olweusbullying. This large, long term study which began in Sweden in 1970, was to provide the inspiration for many who felt that bullying in schools should be challenged rather than accepted. Since the 1970s, his work in this area had continued with force. Indeed, in 1997-99, he led a group in a large project which introduced the widely respected Olweus (anti-bullying) programme to schools in Norway. Professor Olweus is based at the Research Centre for Health Promotion, University of Bergen in Norway and can be contacted by email.

Teachers play an important part in preventing bullying. This can be through helping to set up a school policy on bullying. It can also be through the work they do in their own classrooms: the curriculum and also the climate they create within the class. To discourage bullying this climate would be one of openness, where pupils felt secure enough to report bullying and knew that if they did so, it would be dealt with fairly. More than this, within the classroom positive behaviour would be encouraged and bullying firmly discouraged.
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Article details

A Mellor (2000) 'Information for Teachers about Anti-Bullying in the Classroom', Information Sheet Number 6, Edinburgh: The Anti-Bullying Network. This sheet can be downloaded here.
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Author details

Andrew MellorAt the time of the study, Andrew Mellor was a practising teacher who had received funding from the Scottish Education Department to carry out this project. He has been actively involved in anti-bullying work in Scotland for almost 15 years, speaking at conferences, writing for academic and non-academic audiences and running in-service courses for teachers. He is now manager of the Anti-Bullying Network, which is funded by the Scottish Executive and based at The University of Edinburgh.

This paper looks at the role of the School Board in a school's anti-bullying work. It suggests various ways in which a School Board could support this work including: discussing bullying at their meetings, organising workshops for parents on the topic, finding out about the local authority's policy on bullying, involving outside agencies such as the police. The paper also stresses the importance of a wide base of support in a school's fight against bullying. This includes all members of the school (teaching and non-teaching staff), the local authority, family and the wider community, including police, bus companies and community groups.
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Article details

Scottish Office Education Department (1994) 'School Boards. Focus on Bullying', Focus Number 4, Edinburgh: Scottish Office Education Department. This paper can be downloaded here.

An anti-bullying pack, which was sent to many schools in England, looked at what could be done to help reduce bullying in school. The various suggestions included ways in which adult supervisors could help prevent bullying in the playground.
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Article details

Department for Education and Employment (Revised 2002) 'Bullying - Don't Suffer in Silence. An Anti-Bullying Pack for Schools', London: Department for Education and Employment. This pack can be found on the DFES website.

A Scottish report looks at what schools can do and are already doing, to promote personal safety and child protection. It provides suggestions about how themes and resources can be used in the curriculum. It also considers the skills, values and understanding which a personal safety and protection programme aim to develop in the child, for example assertiveness, self-knowledge and self-esteem. If this programme is to work, a school must have a positive school ethos (roughly speaking a positive atmosphere and character). In turn, a successful programme would contribute to this ethos. It is not surprising to find that one of the important areas covered in a personal safety and protection programme is bullying.
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Article details

A Mellor, K Phillips, S Walker and P Munn (1998) 'Promoting Personal Safety and Child Protection in the Curriculum', The University of Edinburgh, Moray House Publications.

A limited number of copies are available from The Anti-Bullying Network at The University of Edinburgh.
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Author details

Andrew MellorAt the time of the study, Andrew Mellor was a practising teacher who had received funding from the Scottish Education Department to carry out this project. He has been actively involved in anti-bullying work in Scotland for almost 15 years, speaking at conferences, writing for academic and non-academic audiences and running in-service courses for teachers. He is now manager of the Anti-Bullying Network, which is funded by the Scottish Executive and based at The University of Edinburgh.
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